Welcome to Lenawee Conservation District

Working locally to solve local resource issues

Mission Statement

To guide the locally led process with urban and rural harmony, for the protection of soil and water resources 

through education and technical assistance, creating a quality environment.


Lenawee Conservation District Board Meeting

Monday May 18, 2020 at 7:00pm

To mitigate the spread of COVID-19 and protect the public health, in-person contact must be limited. For this reason, 

the May meeting of the Lenawee Conservation District Board of Directors will take place electronically.

Members of the public who wish to participate in May’s Board meeting may join electronically by clicking the following link: https://us02web.zoom.us/j/83447335246?pwd=WThPK0Z2emhZQ2lGcDRjdTdnTjVidz09

Meeting password - 2sZxyp

Questions or suggestions may be submitted via email to [email protected] or by phone at 517-263-7400


Our 2020 Tree Sale Fundraiser is finished and to all the wonderful tree sale volunteers, a huge THANK YOU!

Your willingness to assist us during this uneasy time in our state helped to make our 2020 sale a success. 

WELCOME NEW DISTRICT MANAGER - BROOKE BOLLWAHN

Brooke, who joined the District on March 3rd, is originally from South Haven, Michigan, though she has spent the last few years in San Antonio, Texas as the Technical Training Manager for the Veterinary Resources Group at the Southwest National Primate Research Center.

She has significant work experience in program/project management, regulatory compliance, training development/presentation, and research design/execution.  Though Brooke enjoys the biomedical research field, she had been working toward a career change in the hope of finding a position with a focus on sustainability and natural resources.

To facilitate this transition, she obtained a Master of Science Degree in Sustainability Studies from Texas State University, and a Master of Public Administration from Texas State University to supplement her Bachelor of Arts in Psychology and Sociology/Criminology from Valparaiso University.

In her spare time Brooke enjoys camping, reading, motorsports (doing, not watching), and spending time with family, friends, and her African Grey parrot (Havok).

She is extremely excited to move back to Michigan and get comfortable with the ins and outs of her new position.

She is also looking forward to finding some morels this spring, since opportunities to hunt them in Texas were non-existent!


Michigan Conservation District History

Established in 1946, Lenawee Conservation District is an independent county level resource assisting residents, producers, and communities to help resolve natural resource concerns. The District is self-funded, serving the public with revenue obtained through an annual tree and shrub fundraiser sale, grants, and county appropriations.

Lenawee Conservation District works with a variety of other local, state, and federal agencies and organizations to accomplish greater results in conservation and protection of our local natural resources.

As a result of the Dust Bowl in the 1920s from severe erosion due to negatively impacting farm practices, Congress established the Natural Resources Conservation Service, which directed money toward programs that would help protect natural resources and empower landowners to become better stewards of the land. But with no delivery approach for the federal programs, Congress realized that a local level organization was needed to help promote conservation programs available to agricultural landowners.

Thus, a Conservation District Law was established, allowing communities to elect their own county conservation district boards, which would partner with the federal agencies and serve as the storefront and information center for available conservation programs and assistance.

District Grants

Lenawee Conservation District is rolling out its latest conservation programs for Lenawee County.

"Soil Erosion 101, Back to Basics" was approved for installation of basic conservation practices addressing gully and concentrated flow erosion. By installing grass waterways, erosion control structures, and water and sediment control basins throughout the county, the program will provide a flat rate payment for installation not to exceed a 70% cost-share rate.

"Taking Nutrient Management to Another Level" is designed for new technology that improves the efficiency and/or reduction of phosphorus and nitrogen applied to cropland fields. Funding could include yield monitors, hydraulic down pressure, electric drives, variable rate, GPS, nitrogen applicators, strip-till equipment, cover crops, and no-till combo just to list a few.

If you are interested in applying for the Nutrient Grant, you may Click Here to access the application.

Grants awarded to Lenawee Conservation District from the Michigan Department of Environment, Great Lakes, and Energy (EGLE), formerly DEQ, and the Great Lakes Commission are to work with farmers within Lenawee County on potential improvements toward water quality and the impact to Lake Erie. These projects are in an effort to meet the State of Michigan's phosphorus reduction goals of 20% by 2020 and 40% by 2025 within the River Raisin. Farmers have the ability to receive some assistance to incorporate the following Best Management Practices (BMPs) in targeted watersheds: Drainage Water Management Structures, Buffer Strips, Saturated Buffers, Blind Inlets, and GPS Nitrogen sensors.

View the funding opportunities that the Lenawee Conservation District has for Best Management Practices by clicking on the grant application below:

BMP Grant Application or contact the Lenawee Conservation District office at 517-263-7400 Ext. 3 for an application.

Click here for Strip Tiller Grant application. 

Education

Rural

Urban